backResearcher Profile

James E. Thomas, PhD

Job Title: Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences
Employer: University of Lethbridge
Place of Birth: Peterborough, Ontario, Canada
Public School attended: Immaculate Conception
High School attended: St. Peter's
Further Education: McMaster University (B.Sc., Ph.D.).
Geographic focus of research: Alberta, USA

Brief synopsis of current research:
DNA fingerprinting of trout and walleye: A study of the distribution and evolution of trout and walleye in Western Canada and northern United States.

Assessment of Water Quality: A study of microbial contamination of surface and ground waters in southern Alberta, a region which uses extensive irrigation to support forage, grain, potatoe, sugar beet, oil seed and intensive livestock farming operations. This is a new initiative that has been developing over the past two years.

Recent Publications:

Thomas, J.E., Prozniak, C., Sandham, R., Kirk, H., Chew, L. and Buchwald, V. Genetic variation in populations of walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) from Central Alberta. Alberta Fisheries Management Enhancement Program and the Alberta Conservation Association, P.O. Box 40027, Baker Centre Postal Outlet, Edmonton, AB, T5J 4M9, Canada, 1999.

Thomas, J.E., Sandham, R., Pienkowski, C., Gonci, D., Chee, G., Groft, D., Chew, L., Clayton, T. and Fitch, L. Genetic variation in populations of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from Glacier National Park. Report to the U.S. National Park Service, Glacier National Park, West Glacier, Mt 59936, U.S.A., 1997.

Thomas, J.E., Sandham, R., Pienkowski, C., Gonci, D., Chee, G., Groft, D., Chew, L., Clayton, T. and Fitch, L. Genetic variation in populations of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) from Alberta. Report to Alberta Fisheries Management Enhancement Program, Alberta Conservation Association, P.O. Box 40027, Baker Centre Postal Outlet, Edmonton, AB, T5J 4M9, Canada, 1997.

Comments:
Water is one of the most important resources that we have on this planet. Maintenance of plentiful and healthy water resources in Canada for use in industrial, agricultural and domestic applications will require a concerted effort on our part to understand the physical, chemical and biological parameters that affect water quality and quantity within the Nation.