backResearcher Profile

David J.W. Piper

Job Title: Research Scientist
Employer: Geological Survey of Canada
Place of Birth: Guildford, England, UK
High School attended: Trinity School, Croydon
Further Education: Cambridge, UK (B.A., Ph.D.).
Geographic focus of research: Continental margin off eastern Canada (i.e. Nova Scotia, Newfoundland & Labrador, Nunavut), France, Greece

Brief synopsis of current research:
I work on seabed conditions that are hazardous for utilization of the deep-water areas off eastern Canada, so I work on things like the problems of landslides and shallow gas venting for hydrocarbon exploration and telecommunication cables. I also work on the effects of sea level change and neotectonics on the architecture of marine sediment bodies. I am interested in turbidity currents and their role in sedimentation.

E-mail:
piper@agc.bio.ns.ca

Website:
www.dal.ca/~wwwocean/bienniel/geological/piper.htm

Recent Publications:

NISBET, E.G and PIPER, D.J.W., 1998. Giant submarine landslides: slumps, megaturbidites and their impact. Nature, v. 392, p. 329-330

STEA, R.R., PIPER, D.J.W., FADER, G.B.J, and BOYD, R., 1998. Wisconsinan glacial and sea level history of Maritime Canada and the adjacent continental shelf: a correlation of land and sea events. Geological Society of America Bulletin, v. 110, p. 821-845.

PIPER, D.J.W., COCHONAT, P. and MORRISON, M.L., 1999. Sidescan sonar evidence for progressive evolution of submarine failure into a turbidity current: the 1929 Grand Banks event. Sedimentology, v. 46, p. 79-97

PIPER, D.J.W., HISCOTT, R.N. and NORMARK, W.R., 1999. Outcrop-scale acoustic facies analysis and the 0-15 ka development of Hueneme and Dume fans, California Continental Borderland. Sedimentology, v. 46, p. 47-78.

MAYER, L.A., SHOR, A.N., HUGHES CLARKE, J.E. and PIPER, D.J.W. 1987. Dense biological communities at 3850m on the Laurentian Fan. Deep Sea Research, 35, 1235-1246.

Comments:
The ocean covers two thirds of our planet. It really is the last frontier on our own planet. I always enjoyed outdoors work and a sense of discovery. Working in oceanography gives me that satisfaction, but also a feeling that I am doing something useful for society.