backResearcher Profile

Sandra Millen

Job Title: Sr. Instructor
Employer: Zoology, U.B.C.
Place of Birth: Victoria, BC, Canada
Further Education: University of Victoria (B.Sc.), Simon Fraser University (M.Sc.).
Geographic focus of research: British Columbia, Pacific Coast (Alaska to Chile), Caribbean

Brief synopsis of current research:
I work on the taxonomy and biogeography of Opisthobranch molluscs. I find, using SCUBA, new species, descibe them and work on their ecology and evolutionary relationships using cladistics. I am currently describing species from British Columbia, the Gulf of California, southern Chile and the Caribbean. In recent years my teaching load has increased to the extent that I have very little time for research.

E-mail:
millen@zoology.ubc.ca
Website:
www.zoology.ubc.ca/~alistair/z/faculty/millen.html

Recent Publications:

Millen, S.V. 1986. Northern, primitive Tergipedid nudibranchs, with a description of a new species from the Canadian Pacific. Can. J. Zool. 64(6): 1356-1362.

Millen, S.V. 1987. The nudibranch genus Adalaria, with a description of a new species from the northeastern Pacific. Can. J. Zool. 65(11): 2696-2702.

Millen, S.V. 1989. Opisthobranch range extensions in Alaska with the first records of Cuthona viridis (Forbes, 1840) from the Pacific. Veliger 32(1): 64-68.

Millen, S.V. & J. Nybakken. 1991. A new species of Corambe (Nudibranchia: Doridoidea) from the northeastern Pacific. J. Moll. Stud. 57: 209-215.

Millen, S.V. & J.C. Hamann. 1992. A new genus and species of Facelinidae (Opisthobranchia: Acolidacea) from the Caribbean Sea. Veliger 35(3): 205-214.

Comments:
I have always loved the ocean and because my father was in the Canadian Navy, I spent a lot of time beachcombing on both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. I learned to snorkle as a child and couldn't wait to learn to Scuba dive. I have been diving from Alaska to the Strait of Magellan and the Indian, Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. I strongly feel that if you are going to truly understand marine animals you have to see them in their natural habitat, so I advise you all to take up diving along with your scientific studies.