backResearcher Profile

J. Daniel McLaughlin

Job Title: Associate Professor, Biology
Employer: Concordia University
Place of Birth: Montreal, QC, Canada
Public School attended: Westfield School, Westfield, NB
High School attended: Loyola High School, Montreal QC
Further Education: University of New Brunswick (B.A., Ph.D.).
Geographic focus of research: New Brunswick, Manitoba, Quebec, South Africa

Brief synopsis of current research:
My research focuses on the taxonomy, life history, ecology , host parasite relations and seasonal dynamics of individual species of helminth (worm) parasites and helminth communities in aquatic birds. I am particularly interested in the platyhelminth parasites (digeneans and cestodes) of ducks, coots and gulls. At present, our work is concentrated on the molecular taxonomy of Diplostomum, a digenean parasite of gulls whose larval stages infect the eyes of fish, and studies of seasonal changes in the helminth communities of eider ducks and ring-billed gulls.

Recent Publications:

McKindsey, C. and J. D. McLaughlin.1995. Species and size specific infection of snails by Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea: Cyclocoelidae) Journal of Parasitology 81: 513-519.

McKindsey, C. and J. D. McLaughlin. 1995. Field studies on the transmission and survival of Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea) infections in natural snail populations in southern Manitoba. Journal of Parasitology 81: 520-525.

McKindsey, C. and J. D. McLaughlin. 1994. Transmission of Cyclocoelum mutabile (Digenea) to snails: the influence of temperature on the egg and miracidium. Canadian journal of Zoology 72: 1745-1751.

Alexander, S. and J. D. McLaughlin. 1997. Helminth fauna of Anas undulata, Anas erythrorhyncha, Anas capensis and Anas smithii at Barberspan, South Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 64: 125-133.

Alexander, S and J. D. McLaughlin. 1997. A comparison of the helminth communities of Anas undulata, Anas erythrorhyncha, Anas capensis and Anas smithii atBarberspan, South Africa. Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research 64: 161-173.