Researcher Profile

D.M. Gillis

Job Title: Professor
Employer: University of Manitoba
Place of Birth: Halifax, N.S., Canada
Further Education: Dalhousie University (B.Sc.), McGill University (M.Sc.), Simon Fraser University (Ph.D.).
Geographic focus of research:

Brief synopsis of current research:
My current research focuses on the analysis of data gathered during the prosecution of commercial fisheries to make inferences regarding fleet dynamics (temporal and spatial variation in fishing effort) and the biology of fish. Data from commercial fisheries will always have the potential to exceed the quantity of information affordably obtained from research surveys. However, it is critical that the circumstances underlying the collection of these data are understood to avoid confusion between natural and anthropogenic phenomena. To achieve this, my research focuses on the quantification of behavioral patterns of both fishers and fish contained within catch and effort data that may produce a biased representation of the fishery.

Mailing address:
Department of Zoology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2
Phone:(204)-474-9683; Fax:(204)-474-7588 (ATTN. Dr. D.M. Gillis)
E-mail:
dgillis@umanitoba.ca
Website:
www.umanitoba.ca/academic/faculties/science/zoology/zoology.htm#Gillis

Recent Publications:

Gillis, D.M. Behavioral inferences from regulatory observer data: catch rate variation in the Scotian Shelf silver hake (Merluccius bilinearis) fishery. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 55:37-46 (1999).

Gillis, D.M., R.M. Peterman. The implications of interference among fishing vessels and the ideal free distribution to the interpretation of CPUE. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 55:37-46 (1998).

Gillis, D.M., R.M. Peterman, and E.K. Pikitch. Implications of trip regulations for high-grading: a model of the behavior of fishermen. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 52: 402-415 (1995)

Gillis, D.M., E.K. Pikitch, and R.M. Peterman. Dynamic discarding decisions: a study of high-grading in a trawl fishery using the principles of optimal foraging theory. Behav. Ecol. 6: 146-154 (1995).