Researcher Profile

David Allan Galbraith

Job Title: Coordinator, Canadian Botanical Conservation Network
Employer: Royal Botanical Gardens, Hamilton/Burlington, Ontario
Place of Birth: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Public School attended: Preuter Public School, Kitchener, Ontario; Centennial Senior Public School, Waterloo, Ontario
High School attended: Kitchener-Waterloo Collegiate and Vocational Institute (KWC&VS or KCI)
Further Education: University of Guelph (B.Sc. - 1982; M.Sc. - 1986), Queen's University (Ph.D. - 1991).
Geographic focus of research: Ontario

Brief synopsis of current research:
I am interested in the genetics and population biology of aquatic turtles, and carried out research into mating systems of aquatic turtles for my Ph.D. dissertation. The species I have worked on most are snapping turtles (Chelydra serpemtina) and terrestrial wood turtles (Clemmys insculpta). At present I am not conducting field research. One of my key interests in aquatic turtles is the phenomenon of environmental sex determination. At Royal Botanical Gardens I am developing conservation biology projects on rare and endangered plants.

Website:
http://myprofile.cos.com/proteus

Recent Publications:

Galbraith, D. A., and Brooks, R. J. 1987. Survivorship of adult females in a northern population of snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina). Canadian Journal of Zoology. 65: 1581­1586.

Galbraith, D. A., Chandler, M., and Brooks, R. J. 1988. The fine structure of home ranges of male Chelydra serpentina: are snapping turtles territorial? Canadian Journal of Zoology. 65: 2623­2629.

Galbraith, D. A., Bishop, C. A., Brooks, R. J., Simser, W. L., and Lampman, K. 1988. Factors affecting density of populations of common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina serpentina). Canadian Journal of Zoology. 66: 1233­1240.

Brooks, R. J., Galbraith, D. A., Nancekivell, E. G., and Bishop, C. A. 1988. Developing management guidelines for snapping turtles. Pg. 174­179. In R. C. Szaro, K. E. Severson, and D. R. Patton (Technical coordinators): Management of Amphibians, Reptiles, and Small Mammals in North America. Proceedings of the Symposium. USDA Forest Service. General Technical Report RM­166.

Galbraith, D. A. 1997. The role of molecular genetics in the conservation of amphibians. Herpetological Conservation 1: 282-296.