Researcher Profile

Dr. John F. Dower

Job Title: Assistant Professor
Employer: University of British Columbia, Dept. Earth & Ocean Sciences
Place of Birth: St. John's, NF, Canada
Public School attended: St. Bonaventure's
High School attended: Brother Rice Regional High School
Further Education: Memorial University of Newfoundland (B.Sc. - Biology), University of Victoria (Ph.D. - Biology), Queen's University (Postdoc - Biology)
Geographic focus of research: British Columbia and Newfoundland

Brief synopsis of current research:
My area of expertise encompasses the ways in which interactions between biology and physics structure marine ecosystems. My PhD research examined the interactions between physics and biology around shallow seamounts. I am currently investigating the role of climate change on the feeding and growth of young salmon in coastal BC. Prior to this I studied the effects of small-scale turbulence on the feeding and growth of larval fish. Other research in my lab ranges from palaeoecology, to bioenergetics, to zooplankton ecology, and research on Marine Protected Areas.

Website:
www.eos.ubc.ca/~dower/index.html

Recent Publications:

Dower, J., Freeland, H. and Juniper, K. (1992) A strong biological response to oceanic flow past Cobb Seamount. Deep-Sea Res. 39:1139-1145.

Dower, J.F. and Mackas, D.L. (1996) "Seamount effects" in the zooplankton community near Cobb Seamount. Deep-Sea Re. 43:837-858.

Dower J.F., Miller T.J. and Leggett, W.C. (1997) The role of microscale turbulence in the feeding ecology of larval fish. Adv. Mar. Biol. 31:169-220.

Dower, J.F., Pepin, P. and Leggett, W.C. (1998) Enhanced gut fullness and apparent shift in size-selectivity by radiated shanny (Ulvaria subbifurcata) larvae in response to increased turbulence. Can. J. Fish. Aquat. Sci. 55:128-142.

Pepin, P., Dower, J.F. and W.C. Leggett (1998) Changes in the probability density function of larval fish body length following preservation. Fish. Bull. 96:633-640.

Comments:
Basically, I like being on and around the oceans. A career in oceanography gives me the chance to study both the ocean itself and the organisms that live in it. Because oceanography is a multidisciplinary science, it also allows me to work with biologists, physicists, fisheries scientists, and mathematical modelers.